Does high stakes testing create a ‘poverty mindset’ in education?

Learning Out Loud

Scared_Child_at_Nighttime “Scared Child at Nighttime” by D Sharon Pruitt – http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinksherbet/206812690/sizes/l/in/set-72157610551917961/. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Scared_Child_at_Nighttime.jpg#/media/File:Scared_Child_at_Nighttime.jpg

Since the introduction of high stakes, standardised exams into education, they have been the subject of ongoing debate, particularly regarding the negative impact such tests have on broader educational achievement. One of the areas that piques my personal interest is the relationship between the characteristics of such tests and the psychology of motivation and learning for students, as well as for teachers and system administrators. So when I read the 2013 piece “Why Having Too Little Leads to Bad Decisions” on Psychology Today, I couldn’t help but see parallels between the characteristics of a ‘poverty mindset’ and the issues that arise around high stakes testing.

The Psychology Today article summarises research into how poverty, or a perceived scarcity or resources, affects the cognitive function and decision making of individuals, with…

View original post 963 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s