Hirsch: the case of France

 

ChristianBokhove 3

Originally posted by Christian Bokhove:

I wanted to do a relatively quick post on something I have been looking at in some tweets. It is related to part of Hirsch’s book on which I had already written. I think it’s quite clear that I like Hirsch’s emphasis on the ‘low achieving’, although we probably disagree on the role ‘systemic unfairness’ plays in schooling. This post, though, wants to focus on one of the pivotal examples Hirsch presents to argue that a skills-oriented curriculum, contrary to a knowledge-based curriculum, increases unfairness: the case of France from 1987 to 2007 (Loi Jospin). I can probably write pages full on the ‘knowledge’ versus ‘skills’ (aren’t skills just practical knowledge?) but let’s just assume that these labels are wholly justified. I will also assume, but find the justification lacking, that what Hirsch says on the page regarding amount of funding, buildings etc. to *not* have had an influence on this, is true…

Continue reading original post

Advertisements